Syllabus

ED 638 Curriculum Leadership I
University of Alaska Southeast
School of Education
Educational Leadership

 
 
Course Syllabus: ED638 Curriculum Leadership I

Instructor: Jerry Schoenberger

Phone: 907-796-6283
Fax: 907-796-6283
Office:  Room 101D in Hendrickson Annex, Juneau Campus
Email: jschoenb@uas.alaska.edu

Office Hours: Anytime by Appointment

 

Course Information:

Class Web Site: https://uascentral.uas.alaska.edu/online/

Section: Credits: 3

Course Subject: Education

Program: Educational Leadership

 

Course Context:

This is a required course in the Educational Leadership Master of Education degree program and the Type B Administrative Certificate.

 

Course Description

This is the third course in the UAS Educational Leadership Program.  It is the first course focusing on Curriculum and Instructional Leadership. This course reviews the best practices of teaching and learning and the skills of supervision, assessment and evaluation in schools. The student will review learning theories, curriculum development, and accountability.  Students will begin the development of an interdisciplinary project using the Parallel Curriculum Model.

 

This course integrates ED691, a 150 hour internship experience, in the cohort member’s chosen school and weekly instruction via distance technology. Candidates will validate their understanding of the role of supervision in instructional improvement, assessment, program evaluation, emerging technologies, learning theories and curriculum development. They will apply the concepts and the theories discussed.

 

The integration of courses resulted from a review of the literature and consultation with key education stakeholders, such as superintendents, principals and the Department of Education and Early Development.

 

Relation to Conceptual Framework:

The purposes of this course are consistent with the School of Education’s Mission, to identify, prepare and strengthen effective educators who make sustained contributions to students and the education profession in rural and urban settings in Alaska and nationally. In addition,this course directly supports the Vision of the School of Education that our graduateswill be informed, reflective, and responsive educators within diverse classrooms, schools, and community contexts.

 

The heart of this course is learning about and reflecting upon the “big picture” of curriculum leadership in order to see how it aligns and guides the educational community. In addition, students learn a number of practical methodologies to help them guide PK-12 stakeholders understand and communicate about the larger issues of standard-based education, celebrating diversity, preparing graduates for the world of work, life long learning and local control inside the global society.

 

 

Instructional Methodologies:

Students will share thoughts, ideas, and issues regarding the use of curriculum and the role it plays in our lives. A variety of instructional methodologies will be used in this course including but not limited to online discussions with peers to deepen course content knowledge, project-based learning, research, and written reflection.

 

 

 

Required Texts:

  • Robbin P & Alvy H. (2014) The Principal’s Companion: Strategies to Lead Schools for Student and Teacher Success, 4th ed. Corwin Press: ISBN 978-1-4522-8759-1
  • Tomlinson, C.A. et al. (2009) The Parallel Curriculum, 2nd ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press: ISBN: 978-1412961318

 

Supplemental References:

Marzano, R. (2004) What Works in Schools: Arlington VA: ASCD

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (2005) Understanding By Design. 2nd ed. Arlington,VA: ASCD

Glickman, Carl D. (2002) Leadership for Learning: How to Help Teachers Succeed. ASCD

Scott C. Bauer and S. David Brazer (2012). Using Research to Lead School Improvement: Turning Evidence Into Action. By SAGE Publications, Inc.

 

 

Course Objectives

Standards Addressed: Ed Leadership Policy Standards ELCC 2011

 

 

Standard 1.0: A building-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by collaboratively facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a shared school vision of learning through the collection and use of data to identify school goals, assess organizational effectiveness, and implement school plans to achieve school goals; promotion of continual and sustainable school improvement; and evaluation of school progress and revision of school plans supported by school-based stakeholders.

 

1.1  Candidates understand and can collaboratively develop, articulate, implement, and steward a shared vision of learning for a school.

1.2  Candidates understand and can collect and use data to identify school goals, assess organizational effectiveness, and implement plans to achieve school goals.

1.3  Candidates understand and can promote continual and sustainable school improvement.

1.4  Candidates understand and can evaluate school progress and revise school plans supported by school stakeholders.

 

 

Standard 2.0: A building-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning through collaboration, trust, and a personalized learning environment with high expectations for students; creating and evaluating a comprehensive, rigorous and coherent curricular and instructional school program; developing and supervising the instructional and leadership capacity of school staff; and promoting the most effective and appropriate technologies to support teaching and learning within a school environment.

 

2.1  Candidates understand and can sustain a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning through collaboration, trust, and a personalized learning environment with high expectations for students.

2.2  Candidates understand and can create and evaluate a comprehensive, rigorous, and coherent curricular and instructional school program.

2.3  Candidates understand and can develop and supervise the instructional and leadership capacity of school staff.

2.4  Candidates understand and can promote the most effective and appropriate technologies to support teaching and learning in a school environment.

 

 

 

Standard 3.0: A building-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by ensuring the management of the school organization, operation, and resources through monitoring and evaluating the school management and operational systems; efficiently using human, fiscal, and technological resources in a school environment; promoting and protecting the welfare and safety of school students and staff; developing school capacity for distributed leadership; and ensuring that teacher and organizational time is focused to support high-quality instruction and student learning.

 

3.1  Candidates understand and can monitor and evaluate school management and operational systems.

3.2  Candidates understand and can efficiently use human, fiscal, and technological resources to manage school operations.

 

3.3  Candidates understand and can promote school-based policies and procedures that protect the welfare and safety of students and staff within the school.

3.4  Candidates understand and can develop school capacity for distributed leadership.

3.5  Candidates understand and can ensure teacher and organizational time focuses on supporting high-quality school instruction and student learning.

 

 

Standard 4.0: A building-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by collaborating with faculty and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources on behalf of the school by collecting and analyzing information pertinent to improvement of the school’s educational environment; promoting an understanding, appreciation, and use of the diverse cultural, social, and intellectual resources within the school community; building and sustaining positive school relationships with families and caregivers; and cultivating productive school relationships with community partners.

 

4.1  Candidates understand and can collaborate with faculty and community members by collecting and analyzing information pertinent to the improvement of the school’s educational environment.

4.2  Candidates understand and can mobilize community resources by promoting an understanding, appreciation, and use of diverse cultural, social, and intellectual resources within the school community.

4.3  Candidates understand and can respond to community interests and needs by building and sustaining positive school relationships with families and caregivers.

4.4  Candidates understand and can respond to community interests and needs by building and sustaining productive school relationships with community partners.

 

 

Standard 5.0: A building-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner to ensure a school system of accountability for every student’s academic and social success by modeling school principles of self-awareness, reflective practice, transparency, and ethical behavior as related to their roles within the school; safeguarding the values of democracy, equity, and diversity within the school; evaluating the potential moral and legal consequences of decision making in the school; and promoting social justice within the school to ensure that individual student needs inform all aspects of schooling.

 

5.1  Candidates understand and can act with integrity and fairness to ensure a school system of accountability for every student’s academic and social success.

5.2  Candidates understand and can model principles of self-awareness, reflective practice, transparency, and ethical behavior as related to their roles within the school.

5.3  Candidates understand and can safeguard the values of democracy, equity, and diversity within the school.

5.4  Candidates understand and can evaluate the potential moral and legal consequences of decision making in the school.

5.5  Candidates understand and can promote social justice within the school to ensure that individual student needs inform all aspects of schooling.

 

Standard 6.0: A building-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context through advocating for school students, families, and caregivers; acting to influence local, district, state, and national decisions affecting student learning in a school environment; and anticipating and assessing emerging trends and initiatives in order to adapt school-based leadership strategies.

 

6.1  Candidates understand and can advocate for school students, families, and caregivers.

6.2  Candidates understand and can act to influence local, district, state, and national decisions affecting student learning in a school environment.

6.3  Candidates understand and can anticipate and assess emerging trends and initiatives in order to adapt school-based leadership strategies.

 

 

 

SOE Conceptual Framework Performance Standards:

Goal 1:  Educators articulate, maintain, and develop a philosophy of education that they also demonstrate in practice.

Performances:

  1. Support their philosophy of education with research-based theory and evidence. (K)
  2. Apply philosophy, beliefs, and theory to practice.  (P)
  3. Abide by a philosophy of education and remain flexible to revising it based on new research and teaching experience. (D)

 

 

Goal 2:  Educators understand how human development affects learning and apply that understanding to practice.

Performances

  1. Identify ways students’ developmental levels affect their thinking processes and learning. (K)
  2. Accommodate differences in how students learn based on knowledge of individual’s social, emotional, and intellectual maturation. (P)
  3. Appreciate unique thinking processes of learners at different stages of development. (D)

 

Goal 3:  Educators differentiate instruction with respect for individual and cultural characteristics.

Performances

  1. Identify strategies for differentiating instruction based on student differences.

(K).

  1. Design instruction that incorporates characteristics of the local community’s culture and that is appropriate to students’ individual and special needs.  (P)

c.  Apply local and Alaska knowledge to the selection of instructional

strategies, materials and resources (P)

d.   Appreciate multiple perspectives and value individual differences. (D)

 

Goal 4:  Educators possess current academic content knowledge.

Performances

  1.  Demonstrate knowledge of the content area taught, including structure of the curriculum, the tools of inquiry, central concepts, and connections to other areas of knowledge.(K)
  2. Connect the content area to other content areas and to practical situations encountered outside the school. (P)
  3.  Commit to professional discourse about content knowledge and student learning of content. (D)

 

Goal 5: Educators facilitate student learning by using assessment to guide planning, instruction, and modification of teaching practice.

Performances

  1. Understand how to plan for instruction that is based on student needs and curriculum goals. (K)
  2. Plan, teach, and assess for optimal student learning. (P)
  3. Value assessment and instruction as integrated processes. (D)

 

 

Goal 6:  Educators create and manage a stimulating, inclusive and safe learning community  in which students take intellectual risks and work independently and collaboratively.

Performances

  1. Investigate and use a variety of classroom management techniques to establish

and maintain a responsive environment in which all students are able to learn. (K,P)

  1. Establish and maintain a positive classroom climate in which students develop self-direction and collaborative skills. (P)
  2.  Commit to ensuring student well being and development of self-regulation and group interaction skills. (D)

 

 

Goal 7:  Educators work as partners with parents, families and the community.

Performances

  1. Develop a sound, broad-based understanding of students’ families and the local communities. (K)
  2. Communicate effectively with parents and community and incorporate local ways of knowing into decision making about all levels of schooling. (P)
  3. Recognize the school as an integral part of the community and value parents as partners in promoting student learning. (D)

 

Goal 8:  Educators develop and maintain professional, moral, and ethical attitudes, behaviors, relationships, and habits of mind.

Performances

  1. Keep current in knowledge of content and teaching practice. (K)
  2. Participate in and contribute to the teaching profession.  (P)
  3. Communicate effectively with students, colleagues, and supervisors. (P)
  4. Value professional ethics, democratic principles, and collaborative learning communities. (D)

 

Goal 9: Educators use technology effectively, creatively, and wisely.

Performances

  1. Operate computers and other technologies and evaluate their potentials and limitations (K).
  2. Integrate technology in planning, instruction, and assessment to support student learning. (P)
  3. Value technology as a tool for student and teacher lifelong learning. (D)

 

Cultural Standards for Educators:

  1. Culturally-responsive educators incorporate local ways of knowing and teaching in their work.

 

  1. Culturally responsive educators use the local environment and community resources on a regular basis to link what they are teaching to the everyday lives of the students.

 

  1. Culturally responsive educators participate in community events and activities in an appropriate and supportive way.

 

  1. Culturally -responsive educators work closely with parents to achieve a high level of complementary educational expectations between home and school.

 

  1. Culturally responsive educators recognize the full educational potential of each student and provide the challenges necessary for them to achieve that potential.

 

6. Culturally-responsive educators incorporate local ways of knowing and teaching in their            work:

a)   Recognize the validity and integrity of the traditional knowledge system.

b)   Adhere to the cultural and intellectual property rights that pertain to all aspects of the local knowledge they are addressing.

 

7. Culturally-responsive educators recognize the full educational potential of each student and    provide the challenges necessary for them to achieve that potential:

a)   Recognize cultural differences as positive attributes around which to build appropriate educational experiences.

b)   Acquaint students with the world beyond their home community in ways that expand their horizons while strengthening their own identities.

c)   Recognize the need for all people to understand the importance of learning about other cultures and appreciating what each has to offer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives – Student Outcomes:

 

1.0 The Impacts Of Curriculum Development
Goal:  To understand the power of curriculum through the creation of sample units.
Topics: Outcomes:
Curriculum as a roadmap for  teaching/learning. 

The power of interdisciplinary curriculum.

 

The impacts of curriculum on both the local community and the global society for students.

 

1.1 Learners will internalize the elements of curriculum development.
1.2. Learner will demonstrate understanding of the Parallel Curriculum Model.
1.3 Learners will develop a Parallel Curriculum Model Unit framework that emphasizes concepts and generalizations that is interdisciplinary and based on ascending student intellectual needs.
2.0 The Challenges and Benefits of Building Professional Growth Relationships
Goal: To gain first hand experience supervising staff in an environment of trust, continuous growth and mutual respect with student performance at the core of all conversations.
Topics: Outcomes:
5 Dimensions of Teaching and Learning 

Professional Development Plan

 

District Teacher Evaluation Process

2.1 Learners will  experience using the 5 Dimensions of Teaching and Learning as a Self-Assessment.
2.2 Learners will  utilize a Professional Development plan to  enhance continuous improvement as a coaching tool.  Additionally, the learner will be able to apply the elements of the PDP to an Improvement Plan.
2.3 Learners will utilize district developed tools for the supervision  process.
2.4 Learners will develop a reflective  narrative  on the process. 
3.0 Professional Development
Goal: To model leadership in a professional learning community
Topics: Outcomes:
Collaboration 

Adult Learning Theory

 

Professional Development Options

3.1 Learners will model collaborative professional growth strategies
3.2  Learners will  use adult learning techniques and to meet colleagues needs.
3.3 Learners will provide a professional growth opportunity for their team members. 
4.0 Time on Task Management
Goal: To develop an understanding of the many tasks that principals must prioritize and complete.
Topics: Outcomes:
Instructional Leadership TasksManagement Tasks 4.1 Learners will review the draft Principal’s Activities Calendar
4.2 Students will  Update the calendar based upon site context demands.
4.3 Learners will complete a write reflection regarding the calendar. 
5.0 Instruction
Goal: To internalize classroom practices that are proven to offer greater research-based student performance results based upon learning theory. 
Topics: Outcomes:
Social Learning TheoryCritical Pedagogy

Constructivism

Behaviorism

5.1.Learners will research a Learning Theory of interest and provide two journal critiques.5.2 Learners will prepare a PowerPoint on their learning theory research and present to cohort members.

 

 

 

Grading Scale:

A = 90-100% B = 80-89% C = 70-79% D = 60-69% F = below 60%

 

Requirements and Evaluation Criteria:

Grades will be based on the following:

1. Successful completion of all assigned projects

2. Active participation in discussions and other process experiences

3. Scoring  and guidelines will be provided for each work product

 

 

Deliverables Points Due Date
Class Participation 75 (C&I) Weekly
Online Reflections 75 (C&I) Weekly
Learning Theory Presentation 75 9/24/14
Journal Critiques 25 10/1/14
Professional Development Project 50 11/19/14
Peer Coaching (FALL) 100 12/3/14
PCM Unit Framework (FALL) 85 12/3/14
Final Paper 50 12/10/14
Total 535

 

 

 

 

Product Descriptions:  Jerry Schoenberger  UAS ED Leadership Program: 638

 

Course Participation/Attendance/Voice/Preparation/Closure  (C & I)  (75)

This assessment will be based on four factors: Attendance/Voice/Preparation/Closure

Attendance is worth 15 points. Missing one class results in no loss of points. Two absences result in the loss of 10 points.  Three absences result in the loss of 20 points . Four absences results in the loss of 30 points. A partial absence counts as an absence unless the professor determines otherwise.

Voice is worth 15 points.   Two points per session determined by the professor including large and small group sessions.

Preparation is worth 15 points.  Based upon evidence of having read the material and demonstrating readiness for activities.  Two points per session.

Closure is worth 5 points.  Five points is earned for sharing an insight from the

session. Five points is earned for recognizing the contribution of a cohort member and the reason why it was significant to you.

 

 

Weekly Online Reflections  (C & I)  (75)

Completion of all expected reflections in a timely, thoughtful manner.

Fifty points (50) will be awarded for completing all, reflections in timely, thoughtful manner.

Each cohort member will have latitude between 30 and 50 points.

Thirty points (30) will be awarded for most reflections in a timely and thoughtful manner.

Each cohort member will have latitude between 30 and 0 points.

Zero points (0) will be awarded for very limited reflections, often late and/or lacking a sense of depth

 

 

 

General Class Participation and Online Reflection Expectations:

 

Exceeds Expectations Meets Expectations Below Expectations
  • Student always participates in Elluminate sessions (unless an emergency arises and an alternative assignment is submitted).
  • Discussion Board posts are on time.
  • Student often asks probing questions or contributes ideas and responses that generate discussion.
  • Contributions indicate analysis of reading beyond information stated directly in the text. Often provides contributions from weekly discussions with mentor.
  • Entries and quotations from readings are made in good academic form with clarity and precision.

 

  • Student participates in the majority of Elluminate sessions.
  • Majority of Discussion Board posts are on time.
  • Student contributes in a meaningful way.
  • Contributions indicate student has prepared by reading assigned text.  Provides some contributions from weekly discussions with mentor.
  • Entries and quotations from readings are most often clear and precise.

 

  • Student does not participate in the majority of Elluminate sessions.
  • Discussion Board posts are rarely on time.
  • Student contributions are minimal, vague, and/or insubstantial.
  • Contributions reflect lack of understanding or completion of assigned reading and activities.
  • Entries contain many convention errors and a lack of attention to academic form.

 

  1. Please be concise in your online entries, most often not exceeding around 300 words. This is not a hard and fast rule, but I ask that you write mindfully as excessively long entries are time consuming for all of us.
  2. It is your responsibility not only to add your thoughts and responses to discussions, but also to respond to the ideas presented by others in your response group.

 

 

 

Professional Development Project (C)  (50)

Submit your plan (10 points), presentation materials (20 points) and your analysis of how the presentation was successful and what you would do differently (20 points).

 

 

Interdisciplinary Unit PCM  (C) 100

Background for Unit

Content Framework

Organizing Concepts

Principles and generalization

Standards for Social Studies

Skills

Making Sure the Parallels Remain Central in Teaching and Learning

Content

Assessments

Teaching Strategies

Learning Activities

Grouping Strategies

Products

Resources

Extension Activities

Modifications for Learner Needs, including AID

Unit Sequence, Description, and Teacher Reflections

Pre-assessment

Two Weeks of Lessons

 

Scoring: Ten points (10) for a clear understanding of concepts and principles and a clear identification of what the student will be able to know, do and be like.  Forty points (40) for designing teaching and learning activities that address the four parallels.  Ten points (10) for designing a product into the outcomes. Ten points (10) for an introductory activity and ten points for a unit closure activity. Twenty points (20) for a pre and post assessment.  Bonus points (10)

for addressing grouping strategies, resources, extensions and AID.

 

 

Journal Critiques  (25)

These critiques should inform your learning theory presentation.  At least one should be by an original author.

 

 

 

 

Learning Theory Presentation (C) (75)

History/Definition/Key Elements: What is this theory? (20 points)

Detailed Summary for Cohort: What is important to us? (15 points)

Application:  How might we use this in our schools and classrooms? (15 points)

Evaluation: What do you see as strengths and weaknesses of this theory? (15 points)

Linked to Student’s Research Journal and presented in Portfolio (10 points)

 

Coaching Plan (C) (100)

Elements:

Pre-assessment (5)

Pre-observation (5)

Observation (5)

Professional Development Plan (15)

Post Conference (10)

Pre-observation  (5)

Observation (5)

Post-Conference (10)

Observations write up per district policy (20)

Post analysis reflection (20) (Write-up)

 

Write-up should focus on stated target of plan, evidence of results and collaborative process. Points are distributed for each document as indicated above.

 

 

 Final Paper (C) (50)

A reflective paper about what you learned in this course. (15) How you might apply these new insights at your site (15) and how you have grown over this semester as an educational leader (20)

 

Field-based Components/Competencies Expected:

Students will be expected to apply what they have learned in their coursework and develop an informed, reflective and responsive relationship with their mentors and the needs of their school.

 

Technology Components/Competencies Expected:

Technology will be infused in everything students do. An end product is not only knowing how to use the technology covered but also when it can be used to enhance learning.

 

Diversity Components/Competencies Expected:

Respecting the cultural and learning preferences of students is of critical importance. Through the course activities, students will have an opportunity to reflect on the importance of leadership in advancing social and cultural diversity and, in particular, reflecting on the relationship between Alaska culture and future-focused success.

 

Students with Special Needs:

The University of Alaska Southeast is committed to equal opportunity and programmatic access for students with disabilities. Students who need a modification or accommodation to participate in any UAS program or service should contact the Student Resource Center at Phone: 907 796-6000 or Toll-free: 1-877-465-4827 (text telephone is also available at this number). Early contact with the Student Resource Center helps ensure a positive educational experience.

 

Academic Honesty

All students are expected to adhere to the academic honesty standards of the University of Alaska Southeast. Violations of academic honesty (e.g., submitting work completed by others, plagiarism, etc.) will result in appropriate sanctions ranging from course failure to expulsion.  If you have any questions about course assignments/activities and potential violations of academic honesty, ASK the instructor BEFORE engaging in the assignment/activity.

Master Class Schedule (Topics, Readings, Assignments – ED638/ED691)

The class begins at 4:00 pm and ends at 6:45 PM every Wednesday.

Class begins September 3th, 2014 and ends December 10th, 2014.

 

Week/Date Topics Reading Due Assignment Due *
Week 1September 3
  • Organization of Class
  • Learning Theories
  • The Role of Leader as Learner
Robbins:3rd-Leader as Learner pp. 2-9

4th-Leader as Learner pp. 3-14

 
Week 2September 10

 

  • Define Curriculum & Explore Parallel Curriculum Model
  • Research Crisis Management Plans
Tomlinson:The Rationale and Guiding Principles pp. 1-14

Robbins:

Enhancing Teacher Growth

pp. 82-100

 
Week 3September 17
  • Analysis of Fall Newsletter
  • Elements of Crisis Management Plan
  • Balancing Management & Leadership
Robbins:Leader as Manager pp. 10-22

Tomlinson:

Overview of Parallel Curriculum Model pp15-36

 
Week 4September 24
  • Exploring Human Relations Skills
  • Progress on the SIP
Tomlinson:Elements of Curriculum Design pp. 37-74

Robbins:

Art of Human Relations pp. 40-46

  • Fall Newsletter
  • Learning Theory Presentation
Week 5October 1
  • Expectations and Looking Ahead
  • Internship Experiences

 

Tomlinson: The Core Curriculum Parallel Model pp.75-90Robbins: Managing Time pp. 47-52

 

 
Week 6October 8
  • Core Curriculum Parallel Refining Understanding of PCM
Tomlinson: The Core Curriculum Parallel Model pp. 91-114Robbins: Success Through Collaboration pp. 53-59

 

  • Journal Critiques

 

Week 7October 15
  • Enrollment Implications for Budget
  • Work on PCM Unit

 

Tomlinson: Curriculum of Connections Parallel pp. 115-132Robbins: Understanding, Planning and Implementing Change pp. 60-69

 

 
Week 8October 22
  • Refining Understanding of PCM
  • Budget Implications for Next Year
Tomlinson:The Core Curriculum Parallel Model pp. 133-150

Robbins:

Leader as Shaper of School Culture pp. 23-38

  • Crisis Management Plan

 

Week 9October 29
  • Leader as Shaper of School Culture
Robbins: Maximizing Feedback on Teaching pp. 101-108 
  • School Improvement Plan
Week 10November 5
  • Topic, Concepts and Generalization in PCM
Robbins: Building a Vision and Mission Together pp. 70-80
  • Budget Enrollment Projection Analysis/Reflection
Week 11November 12
  • Curriculum of Connections Parallel
Robbins: Faculty Meetings pp. 129-137

 

 
Week 12November 19

 

  • Faculty Meeting Strategies
Robbins: Asking the Right Questions about CIA pp. 138-151
  • Winter Newsletter including analysis

 

Week 13November 26
  • Building Mission and Vision in Schools
  • Professional Development Project
Week 14December 3
  • Reflection and Closure
  • Discussion about Significant Projects
 

 

  • PCM Framework
  • Peer Coaching Plan
Week 15December 10
  • Closure
  • Final Paper
  • Internship Log

 

* All assignments are due on the Saturday following class.

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